#MusicMonday: Interview with Ellis Ludwig-Leone from San Fermin

When we visited Texas last month for Austin City Limits, we met up with San Fermin. And now, we’re excited to collaborate with San Fermin this holiday season on a holiday inspired playlist, which you can hear in stores from 11.21-12.1 and on Spotify. Want to see San Fermin play live in New York City? Enter our AEO x San Fermin Sweepstakes! Check out the Official Rules to win a pair of tickets for their December 17, 18 or 19 show.

We loved talking with San Fermin so much that we extended the conversation later with Ellis Ludwig-Leone, keyboardist and founding member of the band. We talked about everything from the inspiration behind their newest song, “No Devil,” to the band’s most embarrassing moment on tour. Check out our interview with Ellis below.

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Ellis on the keys during a show.

AEO: You’re embarking on your next European Tour soon, but by the time this publishes you’ll have finished it. What are you most looking forward to during that tour? 
Ellis: It’s our fifth or sixth European tour, so we kind of know what to expect when we get there. One of the things that’s so great about going to Europe is that there’s a sense of history there. Every venue you play is historic in some way. Every city you go to, you’ve heard about. That’s a thrill. It’s a real cultural experience. In particular, I always love when we play France. France is my favorite country to play outside of the U.S. We always get really good crowds there & the food is great.

AEO: So France is your favorite international country, but what is your favorite U.S. city to play?
Ellis: It’s hard to compete with New York because that’s where we’re from. We’ve played some really memorable shows there. I guess if I had to choose somewhere outside of New York… I really like playing San Francisco. That’s been a great place for us.  I love being in the city.

San Fermin

AEO: We met you & the band at Austin City Limits this year. How was your time in Austin? 
Ellis: Austin is definitely one of my favorite cities to play, although it’s actually funny because we’ve now been to Austin five times, and every single time, it’s been for a festival. We’ve never done a headline show there. This time we were touring with Alt-J, so we played ACL Fest, and that night we played a show with them at Austin Music Hall, which was one of the last show’s they’ll ever have at that venue. It actually might have been my favorite show we’ve ever played.

AEO: You mentioned you love playing in NYC a lot, so we’re wondering what makes a show there more memorable for you?
Ellis: One thing that makes NYC different is that our friends & family are there, so it really is a different energy when you there are people who you love and care about are going to be there. Because we started here, we’ve played here more than other places. We have more of a track record here. We’ve done some really cool shows. We’ve played with St.Vincent at Prospect Park, which was awesome because I live across from Prospect Park.

AEO: Is there a certain place or festival you dream of performing?
Ellis: I’d love to play Primavera Sound in Spain. That festival is sort of known as one of the most fun places to play. In terms of a headline show but Barclay’s Center or Madison Square Garden would be a real thrill. Maybe someday!

San Fermin

AEO: You’ve toured with and played with other big names like the Arctic Monkeys. What are some things you take away from playing with or opening for other bands?
Ellis: When I started the band, I wasn’t even thinking about it being a touring band. I really just wanted to make a record. It’s been a cool and unexpected thing that now that we tour all the time, we get to see all these bands up close and play with them. I found my musical influences have really opened up. I know contemporary music a lot better than when I started the band. After playing with Alt-J, I basically have all of their music memorized. Stuff sort of seeps in here and there, when you pick up a nice harmonic motion or an interesting live thing that they’ll do. You pick those things up along the way, and that’s what makes you a complete and professional band.

Ellis

AEO: Considering now that you’re an eight-piece, touring band, it’s interesting that you only wanted to make an album when you first started. How did you get to where you are now as an ensemble?
Ellis: When I wrote the first record, because I wasn’t thinking of it as a touring band, I basically just wrote for whatever I wanted. I’d have, like, all these horns and strings. My background is in writing instrumental music. I studied classical music in college, so I knew how to do that stuff. Our label said I had to figure out how to make this thing work on the road. From there, I whittled it down from twenty-two musicians to eight, which is still a huge band, but it’s the minimal number of instruments you can bring and still make this music sound big and lush. That process was when it turned from a solo project to a real band.

AEO: Is there anyone you’d love to perform or collaborate with in the future?
Ellis: If we’re talking pipe dreams, I’d love to play with Paul Simon. He’s always been someone I’ve looked up to. It would be cool not only from a personal standpoint but also an historical standpoint. I’d be playing with someone who’s really done so much for music.

San Fermin

AEO: Were you friends with the other band members before this?
Ellis: Allen, who sings lead guy vocals, and I have been really close since we were fifteen. We met at a summer songwriting/music camp at Berklee College of Music, actually. The brass players I knew from college, and everyone else I recruited when I got to New York.

AEO: When you’re creating music now, do you write as a whole band or are you still mainly doing the writing?
Ellis: I still do all the writing because it’s sort of how we started. There’s a little more room in the live show for people taking liberties. Everyone kind of knows the structure of the band, and it kind of eliminates that drama where everyone has a song.

San Fermin

AEO: Do you know you want to feature a specific instrument or does that happen organically for you?
Ellis: At this point I know the musical personalities of all these people. Often we’ll be learning and practicing a new song, and I’ll just be like, “Hey Steve (who’s the sax player), I’m thinking of extending this part a little bit, could you do something like a low growl?” and then it develops into a groove. That’s how the second half of our song Parasites was born.

AEO: Could you speak to how you feel San Fermin is different from other bands?
Ellis: One thing that really makes us stand out is that I write the parts but I don’t sing. That’s kind of weird in the indie world. People are used to staring at the singer thinking they wrote the songs. Because I write the songs and stand off to the side by the keyboard, audiences are little more interested in watching the whole thing. It’s a little more equal that way.

AEO: Speaking of forming the band, how did you come up with the name San Fermin?
Ellis: It’s actually the name of the running of the bulls festival in Pamplona. I like the image of running from something, it resonates with me, especially when you’re running from something that you put yourself in the way of. You’re running from something just because you want to.

San Fermin

AEO: What inspired you to be a musician?
Ellis: When I was in high school, I had a string of very unsuccessful bands – a metal band, a cover band. I played classical piano on the side but I didn’t tell any of my friends because I thought it was kind of nerdy. When I got to college I tried to put that stuff together. I started writing arrangements for my bands and use my skills as a musician with my desire to write songs. That’s when I thought I could do this as a real job.

AEO: Do you have any advice for someone who wants to get into music?
Ellis: Treat music like it is your job, not something you do after whatever it is you do to make money. When I was in school, I would write music before I would do my homework. Think of it as your profession even before you’re making money doing that, because otherwise it can take a backseat to whatever else you’re doing, and suddenly you’ll have missed your shot.

San Fermin

AEO: Are you starting to work on your next album now as you’re touring?
Ellis: I’m actually waiting on purpose. I’ll probably start writing in the spring. In the meantime, I’ve been writing other music like orchestra pieces and ballets. When I come back to the band, I’ll have a fresh slate.

AEO: The band recently released “No Devil.” Tell us more about the inspiration behind the song.
Ellis: That’s the one song I’ve written since the last album came out. We were on the road, and that song sort of has a road feeling to it. Whenever I’m gone on tour, I find that I start feeling guilty about being away from home. It’s about thinking I’m running from some demon but it’s alright, it’s okay to be doing what I’m doing.

San Fermin

AEO: Do you have a funny or embarrassing moment on tour?
Ellis: I hold this moment very dear to my heart. We were playing in Paris, and we walked on stage and our trumpet player John had a habit of raising his arms as we walked on stage. He was one of the first guys on stage as we walked out, immediately tripped on a monitor and went sprawling across the stage. He landed on all the guitar equipment. It was truly horrendous. We couldn’t start the show for at least a minute because we were all laughing.

AEO: How would you describe your on-stage presence?
Ellis: If you’ve only hear the recordings, the live show is surprisingly active. It’s a really energetic show. The brass players are jumping around and going out into the audience. It’s engaging and complicated because there’s always something going on. I try to stay to the side and let the live show be a moment for everyone else in the band. I like to think of myself as Larry from School of Rock. The shy keyboardist. That’s me.

San Fermin

AEO: Can you describe the band’s everyday #AEOSTYLE?
Ellis: It’s definitely evolved. When we first started the only word you could give it is “scattered.” Everyone came into it with their own look. At this point, we generally wear dark colors, a lot of black. Some navy and dark greens. The girls tend to be more adventurous. Charlene wears a lot of jumpsuits. Rebekah has some really cool leather dresses. Allen has a lot of very small patterned t-shirts and denim overshirts. I generally wear a black denim jacket, a black t-shirt and black skinny jeans. When you’re on the road it helps to have layers.

Don’t forget to check out San Fermin’s Holiday Playlist online & listen for their picks in stores! Let us know your favorite San Fermin song in the comments below.

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Wear America x Wit & Whistle

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Please introduce yourself, your business name, and where you’re from.
I’m Amanda Wright, the girl behind Wit & Whistle. I design and illustrate witty greeting cards and whistle-worthy paper goods. My husband and I live in a quirky 1970s A-frame house in Cary, North Carolina with two dogs, three chickens, and an absurd quantity of houseplants.

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You have been painting since you were a child, what sparked this interest at such a young age?
I’ve been at it so long that I can’t even remember what first motivated me to start creating. I believe my urge to create is a God-given gift, so it was natural for me to start making art as early as I could. I’m sure I was hooked from the moment I experienced the intoxicating aroma of my first box of crayons.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?
I’m inspired by my love of drawing and my desire to indulge in light-hearted creativity. My goal for Wit & Whistle has always been to create a line of products that are both funny and beautiful. I leave plenty of room for frivolity in my designs, because creating is so much more enjoyable if you don’t take yourself too seriously. I want my work to feel like play!

What does the day in the life of Amanda Wright entail?
After breakfast I make a cup of tea and head to my studio. I have a short commute, just a walk down the stairs to the basement. In the morning I ship orders, reply to emails, send invoices, and reorder supplies—all the necessary but boring stuff. I try to reserve my afternoons and evenings for creative things like working on new designs, taking photos, brainstorming, and writing blog posts.

What was the first product you started selling?
I first tried to sell sets of block-printed snowflake cards around the holidays back in 2008. I painstakingly hand-printed each card in metallic silver ink. They were lovely, but no one bought a single one! So, I went back to my sketchbook and came up with a few witty Valentine’s Day cards. I had more success (and much more fun) when I started incorporating my sense of humor into my work.

Educate us on your design process and making methods, what it’s like and why do you love it?
My design process involves spending a lot of quality time with my sketchbook. I usually curl up on the couch with my dogs while I draw. Once I finish a pen and ink illustration for a new product, I scan it into my computer to make layout adjustments and add color. I love all the little imperfections in my work that make it obvious each one of my designs was drawn by hand.

witandwhistle_process1Amanda’s sketches coming to life! Jotter above and Spiral Notebook below.

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If you had one product to describe as your signature item, which would it be and why?
My “uterus” birthday card is my signature item. Slightly inappropriate greeting cards have always been my best sellers, and that particular card has been around almost since Wit & Whistle began. I think it’s the perfect blend of funny and awkward while still being pretty—just the way I like it.

We love your humorous approach on your cards and prints, do you consider yourself a ‘jokester’?
I don’t think of myself as a jokester, I just have a strange sense of humor. In the real world my “humorous approach” is usually just me saying weird things and getting strange looks from my friends, hah.

Describe your decorating style inside your home.
I like calming, neutral colors with interesting textures like metallic gold, exposed brick, and rustic wood. I prefer bright spaces with lots of natural light and a mix of old vintage finds with newer pieces. I have a weakness for anything mid-century modern. Above all, a house isn’t a home unless it’s brimming with houseplants. If I could live in a greenhouse I would be happy!

What handmade possession do you most cherish?
My coffee table is my favorite handmade possession. My dad, mom, sister and I spent a day piecing together the herringbone tabletop from reclaimed barn wood. We finished it off with hairpin legs and carved our names on the bottom. It’s gorgeous, and whenever I look at it reminds me of how awesome my family is. I even wrote a blog post about it!

Tell us something surprising about you that no one would guess!
Running Wit & Whistle is my dream job, but if I had to change careers I’d love to own a small zoo. For now I’ll just have to focus my zoo-keeping energy on my dogs and chickens.

What is the best advice you would give to designers starting their own business?
Whether you feel ready or not, just jump in. If I waited to start my business until I had everything figured out, Wit & Whistle wouldn’t exist. The most important (and most difficult) thing is to take that first step and get going. Just worry about one day at a time, and figure out the rest as you go along. Baby steps!

Check out Wit & Whistle on ae.com, and tell us which jotter or notebook is your favorite in the comments below!

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Wear America X Muses & Rebels

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We sat down with former AEO Women’s Wovens Design Director, Natasha Landenberger, the founder, owner and designer of Muses & Rebels to talk about daily inspiration, the pros and cons of starting your own business and balancing it all. When this Los Angeles native is not hard at work building her lifestyle brand empire, she is spending her weekends making frequent trips to the beach, the Rose Bowl and other local flea markets to find materials, vintage clothing and unusual objects for photo shoots. Basically, she does it all.

How did you start Muses & Rebels and where do you draw daily inspiration from?
I created Muses & Rebels in 2010 after spending a month in Japan with one of my best friends. She had made a beaded necklace that I loved which influenced me to make jewelry while I was staying with her & her family in Osaka. I made my first thread wrapped chain bracelet during this trip. When I returned home, my mom was extremely supportive of the pieces I had made (as most moms are) and told me I should sell them… that was the beginning of Muses & Rebels.  When I launched M&R, it was a new venture into accessories and I am completely self-taught when it comes to jewelry.

On a daily basis I am inspired by images on Tumblr, Pinterest, blogs and magazines. I have always loved the beach and my husband is a surfer, so I am naturally inspired by the surf/beach lifestyle.

You mentioned being completely self-taught when it comes to designing jewelry, can you describe that creative process?
Designing jewelry has been a very different process for me personally than designing clothing. With jewelry, I first find the materials and then design the styles. With clothing, it is the opposite – I design the styles and then find the fabrics and trims that best fit the design. As I am creating the jewelry for a specific collection, I draw from images I’ve curated, key colors for the season, and the overall concept of the collection. Being a self-taught jewelry designer means I am learning new techniques with each design and the collections are growing stronger with my knowledge.

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Muses and Rebels began selling jewelry and and has slowly transitioned to clothing, can you tell us about that natural progression and motivation behind your current assortment?
Coming from a fashion design background, I have always intended to add clothing to the line. I created Muses & Rebels with the idea that it will become a lifestyle brand, not only focusing on jewelry. I first grew the line with a small assortment of hand tie-dyed bikinis and screen printed tees. Adding a men’s jewelry line seemed like a natural progression and also a need in the market. More clothing for both women and men will be added to our online shop with a focus on vintage items that are trend right and pieces you just need to have.

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Can you tell us a little about Muses and Rebels’ “made for you” concept?
The Muses & Rebels’ “made for you” concept means our products are made to order. M&R styles are not mass produced – they are lovingly handmade for each customer in limited quantities. I also like to think of Muses & Rebels as a line with products that are perfect for the individual. These are pieces that are “made for you.”

You’re also a fashion illustrator for many American contemporary brands – how do you balance this, along with your M&R responsibilities?
M&R is my top priority, but I will always make time for fashion illustration opportunities because it is something I truly enjoy doing. In order to keep the business moving forward and take on additional projects, I tend to count every day of the week as a workday. I work a lot, but it is so worth it.

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Can you speak to the pros and cons of running your own company vs. designing for a large brand?
The great thing about running my own company is that I am my own boss. This is a good thing and also a bad thing. It’s great because I am ultimately the decision maker and get to envision and create a brand exactly as I want it to be. Creating a brand and watching it grow and become known is so gratifying and rewarding. It is tough being your own boss because you are completely responsible for all aspects of the business – meeting deadlines, growing the brand, sales, and production. The stress and pressure of the business side of owning a company can be a lot to handle while still motivating to be creative. When compared to designing for a large brand, the business pressure is quite minimal because you have the support of a large company. In many ways it seems easier to design and be creative when you have a team to help produce your designs. Large brands also provide the comfort of a salary, compensation, bonuses and benefits.

Do you have any advice for someone interested in starting their own company?
Don’t wait to start your own company if you have the passion and the idea – take advantage of the moment and dive in. My advice is to be very aware of your financial responsibility for the company, slowly build your brand in a way to minimize your expenses and learn from your customers. It is important to keep the big picture of your company in mind and to not get sidetracked by the minute details.

Want a chance to win a @musesandrebels necklace from our #WearAmerica collection? Follow and RT to enter! See Official Rules for complete details.

 

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AEO Associate Interview: Kai G.

At AEO, we have some pretty talented and amazing associates working behind the scenes to deliver the best  product to date. Senior Fabric Development Manager, Kai Gomes-Brown is no exception to this rule. Get to learn all about Kai and her daily responsibilities at AEO.

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Meet Kai, Senior Fabric Development Manager for AEO and aerie Knits.

Name:  Kai Gomes-Brown

Occupation:  Senior Fabric Development Manager – for AEO and aerie Knits

AEO:  Where are you from?
Kai: 
I’m originally from Fairfield, CT but I consider Queens my home!  I’ve lived in NYC for 20 years!

AEO:  Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do….
Kai:
  Growing up I always loved fashion!   My love for fashion began in the late 80’s when I started watching Style with Elsa Klensch, (a television show about fashion and design from around the world that aired from 1980 to 2001) with my parents on Saturday mornings.  I would watch the show to see designer runway shows presented during New York, London, Milan and Paris fashion weeks.  I learned a lot about high fashion and the designers that created the collections.  In high school my favorite elective course was Home Economics where I learned to sew and then I attended F.I.T. (Fashion Institute of Technology) where I studied Merchandising.  I’ve worked in fashion since graduation for some of the most recognizable names in the industry. As a Fabric Developer it’s very important to stay in tune with the latest and upcoming trends in fabrics and silhouette so I am able to work with designers and fabric suppliers to interpret those trends into fabrics that are in line with the American Eagle Outfitter’s and aerie aesthetics and price structure.  Unfortunately, Style with Elsa Klensch is no longer on television but there are a number of resources like blogs and magazines that I use and are available to everyone to research the latest and upcoming fashion trends!

AEO:  What kind of projects do you find yourself working on from day to day?
Kai:  As I mentioned one of the most significant aspects of being a Fabric Developer is to research in order to stay in tune with the latest and upcoming trends. I work on weekly trend recap reports and competitive analysis reports to share with our designers and fabric suppliers.  Another important function of my day to day responsibilities is to maintain the fabric library that houses numerous types of knit fabrics including: jerseys, ribs, laces, waffles, jacquards and many more.  When a designer is in need of a fabric they can search the library to find a fabric that suits their needs.

AEO:  What do you love most about working with clothing?
Kai:  I love that what you wear is an expression of who you are. It’s really important to me that I develop fabrics that are great quality and on-trend so our customer feels confident when they wear our clothes.

AEO:  We’ve been hearing a lot about plush fabric. Tell us more!
Kai: I’m really excited about Plush!  This fabric is the softest fabric ever!  It’s super cozy and luxe but completely versatile to wear for both day and night!

AEO:  What differentiates plush fabric from other fabrics used in graphic t-shirts and tanks?
Kai:  The biggest difference is that Plush is a rib that is specially treated to get the cozy, plush surface whereas most (but not all) of the fabrics used for graphics, tanks and tees are jerseys with smooth surfaces.

AEO:  What are a few different ways that you can wear this plush fabric?
Kai:  Plush can pretty much be styled with anything!  A pair of AE distressed Hi-Rise Jeggings with AEO Buckle Strap Booties, a Sky High Suspender Skirt with AEO High Top sneakers or a pair of aerie printed Leggings with Riding Boots.  The styling combinations are endless!

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Introducing, Plush Fabric.

Shop the look:
Vintage Plush Heart Graphic T-Shirt
Ruffle Hem Skort
Shimmery Slip On Sneaker

AEO:  What are your top three items for this upcoming season?
Kai:  I can’t name just three!  My top four “most favorite, I can’t wait for fall” items are:  the AEO Sky-Hi Jegging and Vegan Leather Moto Jacket, aerie’s Skinny Jogger and of course, the Plush Long Sleeve T-Shirt!

AEO:  What’s your personal style like?
Kai:  I would describe my personal style as being relaxed, chic and edgy.  I get a lot of inspiration from runway shows and high end designers. I try to interpret that aesthetic into my look but within my budget through-my hair styles, clothing and accessories.  Some of my favorite places to shop are AEO, asos, Saks Fifth Avenue, H&M, Barney’s and Alchemist in Miami.

AEO:  Where do you draw your daily inspiration from?
Kai:  Blogs, magazines, fashion trend services and people watching!  Some of my daily blog reads include:   Stylesnooperdan, MajaWyh, TheyAllHateUs, WhoWhatWear and YahooStyle.  My favorite magazines are V, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Jalouse and Elle Decor.

AEO:  What is your favorite city that you’ve either traveled to or what to travel to?
Kai
:  My most favorite city that I’ve traveled to so far is Barcelona and I hope to visit Paris in the very near future.

Have you worn our new plush fabric yet? If so, tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

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Music Monday: MKTO

Back in August, the talented Malcolm Kelley and Tony Oller from MKTO performed at Stage AE in Pittsburgh, Pa. We were lucky enough to sneak onto their tour bus to grab an exclusive AEO interview, behind the scenes photos and enjoy an out-of-this-world concert. Check out the interview below and keep it classic!

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Music Monday: AEO Up Next: Vance Joy

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For this week’s installment of AEO Up Next, we present Aussie indie folkster, Vance Joy. He’s been super busy on tour and handling the new-found stardom that comes with a chart-topping hit. That hit is called “Riptide” and it’s just about the most simultaneously lighthearted and painful love song out right now. Check it out below and read on to get to know the man behind Vance Joy in the Q & A after the jump.

AEO:  People usually want to know what any artist’s influences are. But we’re going to make you narrow that down to the one album that truly affected your path in music.

Vance Joy:  Elliott Smith: Either/Or

AEO:  Where was your first show and what was it like?

VJ:  It was at the Queenscliff Music Festival when I was 10. I was with my family. My little sister and I sat near the edge of the stage as Jimmy Little played his set. We had had his album “Messenger” in the family car for a while before the show, so we knew the tunes. I have a few strong memories of that night.

AEO:  Anyone who’s seen any movies about rock bands knows that the tour bus can be like an extension of a wild backstage party or a place for band antics. Tell us the craziest or funniest tour bus story to date.

VJ:  Our tour bus isn’t crazy at all it is pretty calm. On the long road trips you need to just zone out and read or watch some t.v show. We have had some late night music dancing sessions which have been memorable. I get so pumped up listening to “Turn Down For What.” And also Sheryl Crow “If It Makes You Happy”, but mainly “Turn Down For What”. We were driving around Maine with turn down for what pumping and getting so fired up.

AEO:  What was the last song you played on your phone?

VJ:  “Mad World” cat Stevens

AEO:  What’s your favorite thing to do when you have a creative block that you need to work through?

VJ:  Go run errands and make them the focus. Make coffee dates and run around like a headless chook.

AEO:  Top 5 albums that anyone who’s reading this should go out and buy right now:

VJ:  Cat Stevens – Tea for the TillermanColdplay – Rush of Blood to the HeadElliott Smith – Figure 8Father John Misty – Fear funKillers – Day and Age

Now that you’ve gotten to know about Vance, channel his look with #AEOStyle.

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Shop the look: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 |

1: Solid Poplin Button Down Shirt
2: Slim Jean
3: Downtown Leather Belt
4: Thorogood 1892 Boot
5: Slim Jean
6: Plaid Button Down Shirt

Want more Vance Joy action? Check out our BTS 1 playlist curated by Vance on Spotify!

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